Awards Judges

Safari Awards Judges

All The Safari Awards Judges have been nominated by the previous years awards winners and finalists and are unquestionably the most highly-respected, knowledgeable independent tour operators selling safaris.

The judges sit at the head of the Good Safari Guide, ensuring that the lodges, camps and operations presented both in the guides and in the Awards really are the best in Africa.

To take a closer look, please visit our Judges page.

Awards Winners

Safari Award Winner

Since their inception in 2008 the Safari Awards have gone from strength to strength, and are now regarded as an industry gold standard.
The 2017 Safari Awards included 16 award categories.


To see a full list of awards winners,
please visit our Past Results page.


The Safari Awards Guidelines

The Safari Awards, sponsored by The Good Safari Guide, are more about excellence than just being 'very good' or 'better than most'. All lodges and operations nominated must adhere to the following criteria (please do not nominate if the safari lodge/camp does not fit these criteria):

  • the property/operation must be located in a wildlife reserve (national or private), or within at most an hour's travel from extensive wildlife (game, bird or marine life), and must not be located in a city or a large town
  • the property/operation must offer wildlife viewing excursions, whether big game or marine wildlife tourism viewing
  • the property/operation must feasibly be part of the 'safari circuit'- somewhere visitors will stay as part of their safari holiday
  • the property/operation can be anywhere in the world, not just Africa
  • the property/operation must not offer guided hunting excursions

Every nomination is individually verified. If a lodge/operation is nominated which does not fit this criteria, it will be disregarded.

In addition, the Safari Awards the criteria for the riding safaris category is as follows:

  • must offer riding as the principle safari activity (whether on horse, elephant, camel etc)
  • must consider welfare of animals as its overriding concern.

Animal welfare can be loosely judged using the following:

  • animals are well-fed, if horses then have well-rounded stomachs
  • animals have ample rest-time; if horses then are ridden no more than once a day, five days a week
  • animals seem healthy and relaxed, with sick animals taken out of circulation